Pictogram Floating Technology Is Making Japanese Toilets the Envy of The World 2077

Pictogram

To avoid direct button contact, A Japanese company developed Floating Pictogram Technology no-touch touch panels.

Japanese toilets are well known for their high-tech wash-and-dry functions, which are operated by a button panel placed right next to or on the wall next to the toilet seat. They are great for keeping your back sparkling clean, but one issue with the new method has been illustrated by the current pandemic-it doesn’t keep your fingers clean.

Touching a panel like this in a public toilet runs the risk of transmitting germs and viruses such as coronavirus, when hundreds of people may have used it before you. To that end, Murakami Corporation, a major car parts manufacturer specializing in rear-view mirrors, based in Shizuoka, is now introducing its expertise to the world of toilets, introducing a brand-new Pictogram technology into the field of sci-fi.

Pictogram
© Murakami Kaimeido

This Pictogram technology opens up a wide range of uses beyond the bathroom with no surface contact required, reducing the risk of virus transmission at ATMs and inside elevators. There are other situations where “floating” technology may also be useful, such as when you work with wet hands in the kitchen and need to control an electrical appliance. ( Alternate uses example below).

Pictogram
© Murakami Kaimeido

For now, however, Murakami is focused on using the technology to upgrade Japanese toilets, with plans already underway to mass-produce the panels in 2022. They say this is a technology that can change the world, and in the near future, panels like this could well become more popular with a growing need for non-contact alternatives as a countermeasure against infectious diseases.

So how does it work? Well, Holographic ‘ Pictogram ‘ technology works in the same or similar way. By simply running a finger through holographic representations of what would otherwise be buttons or keys of keypads, keyboards, and other controls, floating in the air at convenient location-intuitive, touchless control, people can intuitively insert commands and data into a wide range of electronic equipment. An infrared sensor senses a finger’s intrusion into those images recognizes the selected command and transmits the selection to the internal software of the system.

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